Beating the 75% failure rate of getting a patent.

I was told 75% of all patent applications fail, They asked are you smart enough, strong enough, confident enough to get this done Joe? I never considered any of this and charged ahead. Who wants to think about failure, the long shot odds, the deck stacked against you?

That was only the first of two steps with poor success rates, once you get a patent you have to get this patented product to the market and that has an 80% failure rate. So to use an analogy, you made it through the first mountain range and 75% of the people you started with are gone by the time you get to the other side. Do you have what it takes to negotiate a terrain and survive an environment with a 75% failure rate? If you do, good for you because you are now in for a greater challenge. The second step is “brining the product to the market” is there a use for that patented device?

80% of all new businesses fail within 2 years. So here is the math you are facing. 25% - minus 80%= 5%.

You have a 5% chance at getting this through to the world. But wait there is more. Of that 5% only 1% to .5% are medical oriented.  DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES?

My answer was I served in the military and about 1% of the population serves, so I am right in there and I have 100% chance of making this happen. My ultimate bottom line was and secret weapon is this. I served in the Army uniform with two men that gave all. I will not give up. I will take that challenge.

Back in 1987 as a 20 YO 12B Combat Engineer I was in the Alpha Company, 820th Engineers out San Pablo, Ca. We were on annual training at Camp Roberts, California. While training setting up on an ambush at 2am I noticed the guys on my left flank were lagging so I went to help them finish digging their fighting positions. That was Pvt Curtis Young and another soldier. They were so happy I was finishing up the digging they were throwing rocks at me to show their appreciating. The next day it was 105 and we caught a break. The Lieutenant said we were going on a river recon, wink, we really got to go cool off and wash off a bit. My brother Curtis drowned that day and I tried to find him. I swam all over that river bottom. Search and rescue from San Luis Obispo came out and found him just downstream from where I was looking.   I was asked to stay and ID him. I went to his funeral in Oakland, Ca then blacked it out. I blacked it out until my former supervisor SFC Ottolini was KIA in Iraq in 2005. When I went to Mike’s funeral the thoughts of Curtis Young came flooding back. It was then I committed to donating the Temple Massager to service members and veterans in honor of Curtis and Mike. In my darkest days I had no fear or hesitation, they gave all I am not giving up and we do this to honor those who serve. I am doing this with the help of Curtis and Mike. 

Bring it. 

This pic was taken before Pvt Young passed. I am sorry I could not save you my brother. I won’t beat myself up any more. Please know I think of you every day. I drive on only because of you and Mike. I am lucky and honored to have served with you both. I pray I served you well my friends. Peace Peace Peace.

This pic was taken before Pvt Young passed. I am sorry I could not save you my brother. I won’t beat myself up any more. Please know I think of you every day. I drive on only because of you and Mike. I am lucky and honored to have served with you both. I pray I served you well my friends. Peace Peace Peace.